Minnesota Sea Grant

Harmful Algal Blooms

Most algae blooms are harmless, but some blue-green algal blooms can produce toxins that may sicken people and animals. Blue-green algae are found throughout Minnesota and thrive in warm, nutrient-rich lakes.

Harmful algal blooms (HAB) in Minnesota lakes were the focus of workshops in Sauk Centre on March 4, North Mankato on March 5, and St. Paul on March 6, 2008.



Presentation Downloads (PDF)

Welcome & Sponsors [64mb]
Welcome to the Harmful Algal Blooms Workshop. Thanks to the Sponsors!
Algal Ecology - What are blue-green algae? [1.1mb] | Print Version [724kb]
Howard Markus, MN Pollution Control Agency
Algal Ecology, Part 2 [5.7mb] | Print Version [5mb]
Matt Lindon, Howard Markus, & Steve Heiskary, MN Pollution Control Agency
HAB are being studied in the Great Lakes [2mb] | Print Version [1.7mb]
Sonia Joseph, Michigan Sea Grant/CEGLHH
HAB Research in Minnesota - What do we know? [592kb] | Print Version [332kb]
Steve Heiskary & Matt Lindon, MN Pollution Control Agency
Are there human health risks from HAB? [176kb] | Print Version [100kb]
Sonia Joseph, Michigan Sea Grant/CEGLHH
What are the risks for pets & livestock? [48kb] | Print Version [48kb]
Mike Murphy, DVM, University of Minnesota
What do HAB mean at the local level? [2.3mb] | Print Version [640kb]
Annie Felix, Benton SWCD (Sauk Centre & St. Paul)
What do HAB mean at the local level? [5.3mb] | Print Version [752kb]
Sarah Duda, MSU Water Resources Center (Mankato)
MPCA web-based reporting & testing [208kb] | Print Version [108kb]
Matt Lindon, MN Pollution Control Agency

Water Quality:

Topic Highlights:

Contact:

Cynthia Hagley
Environmental Quality Educator

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