Facebook logo Twitter logo YouTube logo Podcast logo RSS feed logo

What is clean water worth?

What economics can (and cannot) tell us about the value of nature and the nature of values

Friday, July 20, 2018
10:00 a.m.
Natural Resources Research Institute
Room 435
5013 Miller Trunk Highway
Duluth, MN 55811

Presentation by Bonnie Keeler, assistant professor, Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Center for Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy, University of Minnesota.

Bonnie will be available for general conversation from 11:00 a.m. - noon at NRRI.

Abstract:

Unbalanced systems of accounting underlie environmental degradation - water pollution and other public goods lack comprehensive policies that internalize their costs and support more sustainable and equitable delivery of benefits. Putting a economic value on these ecosystem services can change the way we evaluate alternative actions and lead to more strategic and effective conservation. Keeler will discuss how economists are mainstreaming nature's values into decisions, and the potential challenges or pitfalls of this approach. She will also highlight opportunities for innovation in economics and environmental policy (and academic training) that can greatly enhance the translation of environmental science to practice and lead to better outcomes for people and the planet.

Bio:

Bonnie Keeler is an assistant professor at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Center for Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy at the University of Minnesota. Before joining the Humphrey School, Keeler was the program director and lead scientist for the Natural Capital Project — a collaborative partnership between the University of Minnesota, Stanford University, The Nature Conservancy and World Wildlife Fund. Keeler leads a team of experts in ecology, economics, and software development seeking to better communicate and quantify the value of nature. Keeler’s particular expertise is in better understanding the multiple and diverse values of clean water. She also oversees projects on the ecosystem service benefits of urban green infrastructure, the costs and benefits of conservation and restoration, environmental justice implications of parks and green space development, and the sustainable management of agricultural landscapes.


This page last modified on July 17, 2018     © 1996 – 2018 Regents of the University of Minnesota     The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer.
Facebook logo Twitter logo YouTube logo Podcast logo RSS feed logo
Logo: NOAA Logo: UMD Logo: University of Minnesota Logo: University of Minnesota Extension